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50 Years of Tsunami Warning in the Pacific

Boat carried onto land by a tsunami at Concepcion Harbor (Talcahuano)

This month marks 50 years since the start of the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Pacific Tsunami Warning and Mitigation System.

This month marks 50 years since the start of the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Pacific Tsunami Warning and Mitigation System (ICG/PTWS). Following the May 22, 1960, Chilean tsunami, which stemmed from a 9.5-magnitude earthquake off the coast of southern Chile, members of the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization's Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission established the ICG/PTWS. Today, the ICG/PTWS, based in Honolulu, Hawaii, coordinates an international effort across the Pacific to enhance tsunami warning and mitigation activities.

To commemorate the 50 years of tsunami disaster risk reduction efforts, the United States is hosting several events, including the 2015 International Tsunami Symposium and Twenty-sixth Session of the ICG/PTWS. These events will also be part of Hawaii's Tsunami Awareness Month, which remembers the 1946 Aleutian Islands tsunami that triggered the start of the U.S. Seismic Sea (Tsunami) Wave Warning System in 1949.

In support of NOAA's Tsunami Program, the National Centers for Environmental Information host the World Data Service for Geophysics, which includes information on tsunamis and is the national and international tsunami data archive. The World Data Service's tsunami data archive and its data management activities will be highlighted at the International Tsunami Symposium. Visit our Tsunami Data and Information page to see all of our tsunami-related products and services.



National Centers for Environmental Information

NCEI icon

NOAA's former three data centers have merged into the National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI).

The demand for high-value environmental data and information has dramatically increased in recent years. To improve our ability to meet that demand, NOAA’s former three data centers—the National Climatic Data Center, the National Geophysical Data Center, and the National Oceanographic Data Center, which includes the National Coastal Data Development Center—have merged into the National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI).

NCEI will be responsible for hosting and providing access to one of the most significant archives on Earth, with comprehensive oceanic, atmospheric, and geophysical data. From the depths of the ocean to the surface of the sun and from million-year-old sediment records to near real-time satellite images, NCEI will be the Nation’s leading authority for environmental information.

Today we've launched a landing page for the new organization at www.ncei.noaa.gov. Visit this page to browse our full spectrum of atmospheric, oceanographic, coastal, and geophysical products and services.

NCEI is committed to continuing to provide you with the data, information, and services you have come to rely on.

If you have specific questions about this merger, please let us know at ncei.info@noaa.gov.




In The Spotlight

World Magnetic Model, 2015 Release

World Magnetic Model, 2015 Release